Academics & Research

Issues of sustainability and diversity go hand in hand. Faculty and students are working on solutions.

Issues of sustainability and diversity go hand in hand. Faculty and students are working on solutions.

In Flint, Mich., a 2014 shift in how the city’s drinking water was sourced resulted in lead contamination that affected more than 100,000 residents, including children and infants. The city, long known for its economic devastation, is more than 50 percent African-American. Two years later, on the Standing Rock Indian […]

Aimee Reichmann-Decker teaches the Psychology of Humor, an advanced seminar for undergraduate students. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

Taking a serious look at the psychology of humor

In The Psychology of Humor, an advanced seminar for undergraduate students taught by Aimee Reichmann-Decker (MA ’04, PhD ’06), humor is both a laughing matter and a topic for serious study. Humor, after all, can be fun, inclusive, gentle and therapeutic. But it also can be uncomfortable, divisive, cruel and […]

Students from the Franklin L. Burns work solar house. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

Solar house contest gives construction students their time in the sun

Looking to live off the grid in style? How about a solar-powered house with energy-efficient appliances; a rooftop deck; countertops made from recycled materials; a water system that recycles shower water; fiber-optic cable that brings natural light into a windowless bathroom; and movable walls that slide to decrease the size […]

Shelf Discovery: Great reading from the DU community

Shelf Discovery: Great reading from the DU community

Whether you read for pleasure or edification or both; whether you thumb through a hardcover or swipe through a device, you’re no doubt in the market for new titles to enjoy. The University of Denver’s community of writers is happy to oblige, producing good reads that raise questions and change […]

Degrees of opportunity: How DU is supporting an evolving student body

Degrees of opportunity: How DU is supporting an evolving student body

These days, the typical college student isn’t so typical. Compared to seven or eight years ago, students entering U.S. colleges and universities in 2018 are less likely to be white, more likely to be the first generation in their family to go to college, and more likely to be older […]

For his documentary film about the club, Scott Montgomery has interviewed former employees, concertgoers, poster artists — including the iconic Stanley Mouse — and musicians who performed at the club, uncovering several DU connections in the process. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

Art professor re-animates Denver rock club the Family Dog

It was in existence for less than two years, but the Family Dog rock club — located just down the street from DU, near Evans and Santa Fe — was the epicenter of ’60s cool in Denver. Opened in 1967, the venue — an offshoot of concert promoter Chet Helms’ […]

Judy Kiyama conducts research on the high school-to-college transition experiences of first-generation students, low-income students and students of color. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

Education professor talks inclusivity and orientations

Judy Marquez Kiyama, a professor in the Morgridge College of Education, was once a first-generation college student whose introductory exposure to her alma mater, the University of Arizona, was through a six-week summer bridge program for first-generation students, low-income students and students of color. Later the assistant director of that […]

Ryan Keeney, a recent graduate student in the Department of Geography and the Environment, created an interactive digital map of every streetcar line that ever existed within the modern boundaries of the city and county of Denver, from the system’s inception in 1872 to its demise in 1950. Photo courtesy of Denver Public Library Digital Collections

Geography grad student explores Denver’s streetcar legacy

Alumni who took classes back in the days when the University was nicknamed “Tramway Tech” know that Denver once boasted a world-class public transportation system in the form of streetcars. In fact, many of the city’s buzzing commercial strips and distinctive neighborhoods — Colfax, Broadway, South Pearl — were once […]

A pilot project that launched in 2017 out of DU’s Office of Teaching and Learning asked students to sit in on classes in academic areas outside their majors and to share their observations and ideas with professors about how to make their teaching styles more inclusive. Illustration by James Yang

Students give instructors lessons in inclusivity

When it comes to making all students feel included in classroom lectures and activities, even college professors don’t have all the answers. Especially when it comes to first-generation students and students from underrepresented populations, both of whom may not be familiar with higher-ed customs and who may understandably bristle at […]

Essay: The First to Belong

Essay: The First to Belong

Lili Rodriguez is DU’s vice chancellor for campus life and inclusive excellence.   I am a double first-generation scholar. By that I mean that I am of both the first generation in my family born in the U.S. and the first generation in my family to attend college. There was […]

Shelf Discovery: Great reading from the DU community

Shelf Discovery: Great reading from the DU community

Whether you read for pleasure or edification — or both, whether you thumb through a hardcover or swipe through a device, you’re no doubt in the market for new titles to enjoy. The University of Denver’s community of writers is happy to oblige, producing good reads that raise questions and […]

DU has, in recent years, become known for its research on family health, peace and stability, and aging. Illustration: Sally Vitsky

Good Work: Inside DU research that is supporting families, helping seniors and creating a safer world

From engineering to psychology, biology to social work, mathematics to law, University of Denver faculty members bring in millions of dollars each year to conduct research on behalf of federal, state and local governments, as well as corporations and foundations. The money is a boon not just to faculty members, […]

“These are extremely important books in American literary history,” Billy Stratton says of captivity narratives, adding that they have done much to shape the public’s image of Native peoples to this day. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

Re-examining Western history with DU’s growing collection of captivity narratives

Whether he’s teaching a survey of American postmodernism, a course on Southern Gothic fiction or a seminar on Native American literature, Billy J. Stratton, an associate professor of English, encourages students to get face-to-face with the text. Not a digitized epub or PDF, but a typeset book nestled between two […]

J.D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy” is the 2017–18 selection for One Book One DU, a common reading program that asks first-year students to explore a single text and examine the many ways it is viewed by others.

One Book program provides community reading experience for new Pioneers

When the 1,400-plus members of DU’s Class of 2021 arrived on campus in early September, they shared at least one thing in common: J.D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy.” The bestselling memoir, which chronicles what the author calls “a family and culture in crisis,” is the 2017–18 selection for One Book One […]

Using ground-penetrating radar, anthropology professor explores the world underground

Using ground-penetrating radar, anthropology professor explores the world underground

Ten miles inland from the coast of the Connecticut River, the landscape is punctuated by a picturesque horse ranch complete with leafy shade trees, white picket fences and expanses of bright green grass. But DU archaeologist Larry Conyers can show you an entirely different picture of the farm … underground. […]