Archive for December, 2006

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note

Curling’s not only for Canadians

Curling’s not only for Canadians

Admit it. You’re one of those people who laughed when curling became an Olympic sport. Sure, you may be justified in thinking that it looks too easy — that any “sport” that requires sweeping ice and yelling at rocks can only be taken seriously if you’re from Canada or Wisconsin […]

Mending broken windows

Why are some neighborhoods prone to crime and violence while others are not? The most common explanation is “broken windows” — the idea that ignoring small problems, such as shattered glass, creates a breeding ground for more serious crime. The theory has shaped community-policing strategies in Denver and elsewhere for […]

Interview: Chancellor Robert Coombe discusses the importance of alumni

Interview: Chancellor Robert Coombe discusses the importance of alumni

Chancellor Robert Coombe discusses the role alumni play at DU.

The thing about a rodeo queen

The thing about a rodeo queen

Don’t let the term rodeo queen confuse you. Oh, Julianna “Boo” Edwards has the beauty, grace and diplomacy of any Miss America all right, but her worn boots and the twinkle in her eye tell of the Western pride, toughness and charisma it takes to represent a community of real-life […]

Letters

The short, happy life of Hilltop Stadium

The short, happy life of Hilltop Stadium

Students playing tennis at DU’s Stapleton Tennis Pavilion or soccer on the fields south of Barton Stadium probably don’t know that they compete on hallowed ground. From 1926-71, Hilltop Stadium loomed on that spot. There, the Pioneers football team did battle on fall weekends before crowds of up to 25,000 […]

Sandra, are you still hungry?

I will never forget Sandra. Her dark brown eyes were shy. Her skin was the color of the coffee my Aunt Lucinda drank with generous amounts of sugar and cream. She had two braids, as did I, but she was tall and thin and I was a bit chubby. We […]

The accordion gets a second wind

The accordion gets a second wind

Something about the phrase classical accordion just doesn’t fit. Like saying kazoo virtuoso or castanet prodigy, it just rings wrong. Never mind that Tchaikovsky wrote serious music that included the instrument. Accordions conjure visions of a street beggar with a monkey, a zydeco squeezebox on Bourbon Street, Lawrence Welk’s champagne […]

The spotted dog tangos with the red umbrella

At last check, the DU bookstore didn’t carry umbrellas with poisonous tips or watches that snap secret photos. And while they’re not required items in a new course called Ciphers & Codes, freshmen this fall are still getting a revealing — albeit more realistic — peek inside the real-life drama […]

So Long, Dewey Decimal?

So Long, Dewey Decimal?

Libraries are having to retool virtually everything they do to adapt to the digital age.

One family’s story

One family’s story

Kim Na doesn’t remember any of it. Her older siblings will never forget it. For three years her family lived in hiding from the Khmer Rouge, the deadly Cambodian regime that killed more than a million of its own citizens. They finally escaped to Thailand in 1980 and reached America […]

Denver’s Immigrant Legacy

Denver’s Immigrant Legacy

Yesterday’s immigrants shaped the Denver of today.

Editor’s note

Editor’s note

Karen Mathis calls on lawyers to volunteer after retirement

Karen Mathis calls on lawyers to volunteer after retirement

As the baby boom generation enters retirement, the impact on the U.S. legal profession will be dramatic: As many as 400,000 lawyers are expected to retire in the next 15 years. If attorney Karen Mathis has her way, many of them will pursue a “Second Season of Service,” during which […]